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SAFMH was represented at the Global Ministerial Mental Health Summit held in London, UK from 9-10 October 2018, that brought together the world's political leaders, innovators, persons with mental health conditions, policy makers and civil society to share the most effective and innovative approaches to mental health and psychosocial disabilities.

The Summit hosted 6 workstreams to showcase innovations from across the globe and work to develop consensus statements to be delivered to political leaders: Children, Young People and the Now Generation; Caring Societies: creating the conditions for inclusion, prevention and wellbeing; The Economics of, and Investment in, Mental Health Finance; A Just Society: supporting societal shifts, tackling stigma and discrimination, creating inclusive societies; Mental Health Services around the World; and Research and the Future of Mental Health.

The workstreams’ recommendations were presented to the Ministers of Health present at the Summit – click HERE for the recommendations.

The Ministers of Health, themselves, signed a declaration in commitment to prioritise mental health in their respective countries – click HERE for the Global Declaration.

Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health and Sustainable Development

The 2007 and 2011 Lancet Series on global mental health helped make mental health care a greater priority worldwide and led to the launch of the Movement for Global Mental Health.

However, it remains a grim reality that the vast majority of people affected by mental health conditions globally still do not receive adequate treatment and care, which prolongs suffering and causes colossal societal and economic losses. The situation is worsened by human rights abuses – and even torture and incarceration – of people with mental health conditions. This is also truly a global issue; for when it comes to mental health, all countries are still developing.

To respond to these challenges, The Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health & Sustainable Development aims to give fresh impetus to the prioritisation of mental health and ensure physical and mental health are valued equally by the global health and development communities. Seeking to catalyse action, the Commission outlines a blueprint for action on mental health to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

One of the unique guiding principles of the Commission emphasizes that mental health should be respected as a fundamental right, by putting people living with mental health conditions at the centre of planning services and challenging stigma. Everyone is entitled to dignity, autonomy, care in the community and freedom from discrimination.

 

Commissioned by The Lancet, one of the world’s most prestigious journals, the final report is the outcome of three years of dedicated efforts by a group of 28 Commissioners from across the globe. They brought considerable expertise in diverse scientific and policy disciplines, as well as lived experience of mental health conditions, to the process.

The Commission was supported by The National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust, Grand Challenges Canada and MQ-UK. The formal launch of the Commission report was launched on 10 October 2018 in London in the United Kingdom, supported by an international group of public engagement team and partners.

To learn more about the Commission, visit www.globalmentalhealthcommission.org

 

How to Communicate Suicidal Feelings

By Kathryn Goetzke

Unfortunately, I know this subject all too well. When I was 19 years old I my dad died by suicide, and I have had an almost fatal attempt myself in my early 20s, along with very regular ideation of wanting to end my life. One thing I have learned through the years, is that if you are suicidal, it is incredibly important to reach out for help in a way that is supportive for all involved.

https://psychcentral.com/blog/how-to-communicate-suicidal-feelings/#.W0PM-cBv0Ps.facebook

PRESS RELEASE: CORRECTING MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT MENTAL ILLNESS AND CRIME

05 July 2017

The SA Federation for Mental Health was recently alerted to a column published by an online news agency, which seemed to link South Africa’s high crime rates with mental illness. While we commemorate Psychosocial Disability Awareness month during the month of July, SAFMH feels it is important to address these misconceptions and their potential negative consequences on the lives of people living with mental health disorders.

The idea that people with mental disorders or disabilities are more prone to violence than other members of society is one of the most strongly held and harmful misconceptions that still exists in our society, and one that is often enforced by media reporting. It is important to recognise the potentially devastating effects that these false beliefs can have on the lives of those living with mental disorders, as it can lead to increased levels of stigma and discrimination, social exclusion and the denial of basic human rights.

The media can either contribute to the belief that mental illness contributes or leads to crime, or help to fight it, through their reporting. Throughout the years many international studies have been done on the portrayal of mental illness in the media, and how this portrayal affects public perceptions. Studies have shown that negative media reporting leads to the perception that mental illness is linked to violence, crime, unpredictability, being a danger to self or others, or that people with mental disorders are passive victims deserving of pity. 

However through positive and fair reporting the media also has the power to help shift public perceptions about mental health, and reduce stigma and discrimination.

Here is what research has found regarding the link between mental illness and violence:

  • “The combined evidence from these studies indicates that…persons with psychotic diagnoses are less likely or at least no more likely to commit violence…a history of delusions and a diagnosis of paranoia were unrelated to future violence.” - Harris, Grant T. and Marnie E. Rice. "Risk Appraisal and Management of Violent Behavior". PS 48.9 (1997): 1168- 1176.
  • "…the vast majority of people who are violent do not suffer from mental illnesses." - American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Fact Sheet: Violence and Mental Illness, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.
  • "People with psychiatric disabilities are far more likely to be victims than perpetrators of violent crime.” - Hiroeh, Urara et al. "Death by Homicide, Suicide, and Other Unnatural Causes In People With Mental Illness: A Population-Based Study". The Lancet 358.9299 (2001): 2110-2112.
  • “People with severe mental illnesses, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or psychosis, are 2 ½ times more likely to be attacked, raped or mugged than the general population." - Hiday, Virginia Aldigé et al. "Criminal Victimization of Persons with Severe Mental Illness". PS 50.1 (1999): 62-68.

With these facts in mind, it is crucial that the media reports responsibly on cases involving persons with mental disorders or disabilities. Speculation, inaccurate or one sided reporting can do an incredible amount of damage and help to increase stigma and discrimination.

Trying to link South Africa’s high crime rates with mental illness or disorders such as foetal alcohol syndrome (which is not a mental illness but rather a developmental disorder), is unfounded and reckless, as it endangers the lives of those who are already vulnerable and face discrimination and abuse. SAFMH would like to encourage all members of the media to report fairly and accurately on mental health and all related factors, and to make use of tools such as the SAFMH Media Guide for Responsible Reporting on Mental Health to guide them in terms of terminology or topics they may not be sure of. Media practitioners are also encouraged to contact SAFMH if they require information, statistics or other assistance. 

 

The SAFMH Media Guide for Responsible Reporting on Mental Health can be accessed here.

 

FOR ENQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Marthé Kotze

Programme Manager: Information & Awareness

SA Federation for Mental Health

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

011 781 1852

 

 

 

 

July Psychosocial Disability Awareness Month

PRESS RELEASE: CALLING FOR INTEGRATED AND UPSCALED COMMUNITY BASED MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

Every year July is commemorated as Psychosocial Disability Awareness Month, and this year the South African Federation for Mental Health is focusing on the need for upscaling and integration of community mental health care services.

The death of 94 mentally ill patients who were transferred from the Life Healthcare Esidimeni facilities to unlicensed NGO’s by the Gauteng Department of Health has placed the spotlight on the many problems existing within the current mental health system in South Africa. South Africa has good policies and legislation for mental health care, such as the Mental Health Care Act and the Mental Health Policy Framework and Action Plan 2013-2020, but the implementation of these policies remain a challenge. Mental health services have in many cases not been integrated effectively into other primary health services, and as a result mental health remains largely marginalised and underfunded. It is important to recognise that the Life Esidimeni tragedy is an example of a symptom of a mental health care system that does not provide adequate treatment or services to the many South African’s who need mental healthcare, along with a poorly-implemented deinstitutionalisation policy.     

Community-based mental health organisations provided crucial services, and without them thousands of Mental Health Care Users (MHCUs) would not receive the treatment and care they need. These community-based organisations are however largely dependent on the support of Government, the private sector and their communities in order to be able to provide effective services. It is necessary for primary health services such as Clinics and Hospitals, as well as social services such as social workers, community care workers, District Health Teams, private sector organisations such as medical schemes, pharmaceutical companies and private sector psychologists and psychiatrist to collaborate more effectively with community-based mental health organisations to provide the services that MHCU need.

Integration of these various services can help to improve access and facilitate the use of services, as well as preventing duplication of services. This collaboration and integration of services can also help to facilitate effective deinstitutionalisation. Deinstitutionalisation is a process of replacing psychiatric hospitals with community-based mental health services for people diagnosed with a mental disorder or intellectual disability.

Throughout the month of July, SAFMH and our Mental Health Societies and partners will be advocating for increased support and funding for community based mental health services, as well as for the integration of mental health services into primary health care on a community level. 

The following are recommendations regarding the increased support, and upscaling of resources for community based mental health organisations, as well as for the improved integration of mental health services:

  • Mental health services must be prioritised and developed with an equal level of high importance across all provinces in South Africa, and across rural and urban areas
  • Existing human and infrastructure resources need to be utilised as efficiently as possible and additional resources need to be developed and or prioritised
  • Services and resources at community level should be developed in consultation with MHCU, their families, NGO’s and other key partners/stakeholders/decision makers/service providers to ensure the development of such services is done in an informed and collaborative way
  • The prioritisation, implementation and monitoring of the MHPF at provincial level is essential, and provincial Departments of Health need to be held accountable for failure to do so
  • Savings generated through budget cuts in tertiary Psychiatric Care Facilities need to be used to support community-based care and to ensure that MHCU have access to high-quality care
  • Government needs to address the pervasive shortfalls in resources needed to adequately facilitate deinstitutionalisation policy requirements
  • South Africa needs to see the development of a range of comprehensive community-based mental health services to ensure that MHCU are provided with a range of community-based services
  • South Africa requires more consistent and more comprehensive subsidisation of community-based services, with adequate increases and timely payments of subsidies to ensure continuity in community-based mental health service delivery
  • Government also needs to look at the types of subsidies/funding opportunities that are made available to NGOs; what is required, in addition to post-funding, is more programmes funding for community-based organisation to aid in the development of more concerted service project development for MHCU
  • Treatment and rehabilitation of MHCU should be integrated into a system of Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR). These PSR systems should focus on areas such as skills training, peer support, vocational services and community resource development, to ensure that MHCU receive support and services enabling them to reintegrate into their communities

FOR ENQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Marthé Kotze

Programme Manager: Information & Awareness

SA Federation for Mental Health

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PRESS RELEASE: SAFMH RELEASES MEDIA GUIDE FOR RESPONSIBLE MENTAL HEALTH REPORTING

PRESS RELEASE: SAFMH CALLS FOR INCREASED COMMITMENT FROM GOVERNMENT FOR MENTAL HEALTH CARE

2 December 2016

Every year 3 December is celebrated as International Day of Disability. According to the United Nations, “More than one billion people, or approximately 15 per cent of the world's population, live with some form of disability. 80 per cent live in developing countries.” In South Africa we have legislation such as the Bill of Rights, the White Paper on Disability, and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities that protect the rights of persons with disabilities. However, without correct and timeous implementation, this legislation is unable improve lives.

Mental health received a great deal of media coverage this past year, mainly due to the ongoing Life Healthcare Esidimeni case and the unfortunate deaths that occurred following the relocation of mental health care users from the Life Esidimeni facilities to community NGOs selected by the Gauteng Department of Health. SAFMH has been vocal over the fact that we believe the relocation of these mental health care users was not handled according to the recommended process of deinstitutionalisation laid out in the Mental Health Care Policy Framework and Strategic Action Plan (2013-2020). Deinstitutionalisation is a process of replacing long-stay psychiatric hospitals with less isolated and institutionalised community mental health services. For deinstitutionalisation to be successful, it needs to go hand in hand with the upscaling of community mental health services.

This year a decision was taken that the National Disability Day event on the 3rd of December will not be a celebration as usual, but rather a commemoration to honour the 37 lives lost. The South African Federation for Mental Health supports this decision, and will be attending the National event, where we will present Government with a report compiled through research of the community based mental health care system in Gauteng. The aim of the report is to show how better implementation of the Mental Health Policy Framework is needed to improve the services and care offered to mental health care users.

In the report, SAFMH has made the following recommendations:

  • ·         The Health Ombudsman’s report on his investigation on the Life Esidimeni case must be made public to ensure transparency and accountability
  • ·         Mental health services need to be prioritised and developed with an equal level of (high) importance across all provinces in South Africa, and across rural and urban areas
  • ·         Services and resources at community level should be developed in consultation with mental health care users, their families, NGOs and other key partners to ensure that the development of such services are done in an informed and collaborative way
  • ·        The prioritisation / resourcing / implementation / monitoring of the Mental Health Policy Framework and Strategic Action Plan at provincial level is essential, and provincial Departments of Health need to be held accountable for failure to do so
  • ·     Savings generated through budget cuts in tertiary Psychiatric Care Facilities (such as what happened with the termination of the Life Esidimeni contract) need to be transferred to support community-based care
  • ·         Government needs to address the widely pervasive shortfalls in resources needed to adequately facilitate deinstitutionalisation policy requirements
  • ·      There is a need for NGOs to become more recognised as key partners in the delivery of mental health services and to be respected and treated as such. Government needs to recognise that without the upscaling of and provision of community-based services South Africa’s commitment towards deinstitutionalisation will never be realised
  • ·      South Africa requires more consistent and more comprehensive subsidisation of community-based services, with adequate increases and timely payments of subsidies to ensure continuity in community-based mental health service delivery
  • ·      There is a need for more family empowerment programmes to ensure that MHCUs who return to their homes are able to receive the support they require from their families and that family members are sufficiently equipped with the necessary skills to help them take care of MHCUs within their homes

SAFMH is alarmed by reports that that the relocation of 240 residents of Eastern Cape Frail Care is being handled in the same manner as that of the Gauteng Life Esidimeni patients, and we are concerned over the wellbeing of this vulnerable group. This Disability Day SAFMH would like to appeal to government to recommit to upholding the rights of persons with psychosocial and intellectual disabilities, and to take every possible step to ensure that no service user in South Africa is subjected to inhuman and degrading treatment through system and service weaknesses.

FOR ENQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Bharti Patel - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

National Director

or

Marthé Viljoen – This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Programme Manager Information & Awareness

SA Federation for Mental Health

 

 

 

Charlene Sunkel, SAFMH Programme Manager for Advocacy & Awareness, giving an interview at the World Health Organisation in October 2015. 

Thursday 3 December is International Day of Persons with Disabilities, and all interested parties are invited to take part in the National Disability Rights March in the city of Tshwane, in support of people with disabilities!

 

South African Federation for Mental Health would like to inform the public about the Mental Health Watch project, which has been created to allow easy and accessible reporting of human rights violations.